CLASS OF 1953 | 2020 | ISSUE 2

A note from Walter Cutler proudly announces that two granddaughters will be entering Wesleyan this fall as members of the class of 2024: Grace Cutler, in Evanston, Ill., and Nina Cutler, New York City. Walt looks forward to following their progress and that of the University.

Ted Shapiro, who responded to Earl Forman’s obituary, recalls while rooming together their junior year that they began dating their future wives. Ted is a professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the Weill Cornell Medical College, where he graduated in medicine and then returned as a professor in 1976. He has been there since. He loves teaching, researching, and “the scope of interests I tap in my work, the foundations were made at Wesleyan. I am proud to say that my granddaughter is a sophomore at old Wes and enjoying a totally different curriculum but the same respect for a liberal education. I have four more grandchildren and two children. Joan and I have been married for 65 years.”

Samuel Dennison Babcock Millar Jr., born Jan. 16, 1931, Montclair, N.J., member of Phi Nu Theta (Eclectic), history major, three-year soccer team, died unexpectedly, Oct. 3, 2019, Wellfleet, Cape Cod, Mass., at age 88. He received his law degree from Rutgers University School of Law. He worked college summers at the family-owned inn on Lake Waramaug. During the Korean War, he served his country as a member of the U.S. Army Reserves. In 1965, Sandy married Judith Johnson, and they raised their two children in Darien, Conn. Sandy was a 40-year resident and real estate/probate attorney in town. He was a partner of his firm Millar & Ambrette, at the time of his retirement in 2003.

Sandy was a firm believer in public service: chairman of the Board of Tax Review, chairman of Gallivant, chairman of the Darien chapter of the American Red Cross (and 12-gallon blood donor), president of the Darien Chamber of Commerce, president of the Darien Kiwanis Club, and president of the Middlesex Club. Given his love of nature, he was active for many years with the Friends of Woodland Park. During his time in Darien, he was an enthusiastic tennis and paddle player. A highlight was winning the Middlesex Men’s doubles tennis championship.

In retirement, Sandy and his long-time companion Frances Hitchcock split their time between homes in Wellfleet, Mass., and Camden, Maine. While in Wellfleet, he volunteered as a docent at the Wellfleet Historical Society. His daily morning routine was to walk for miles at Newcomb Hollow Beach, soaking up the natural beauty, picking up litter, and finding left behind items that someone somewhere might find useful or enjoyable. This morning ritual was capped off by a dip in the water regardless of the temperature. In Maine, he was a member of the Rockland Kiwanis Club and Camden Garden Club. He and Fran enjoyed annual travel adventures overseas. While visiting family in Connecticut, he cheered and applauded his grandchildren at sporting events and recitals. He is survived by companion Fran, his son, his daughter, and four grandchildren. Condolences to the family.

John Miller is at home after four days in the hospital recovering from knee replacement—a knee that too often smashed into hurdles. His annual summer retreat to Central New York to beat the heat may become a fall retreat. Send me a note as to how you have endured the pandemic.

JOHN W. MILLER | jwalmiller@aol.com
306 Autumn Court, Bartlesville, OK 74006 | 918/335-0081 

CLASS OF 1953 | 2020 | ISSUE 1

I received a handwritten note from Bill Rack for my missing class news in the latest magazine. I apologize for obviously overlooking the deadline. Bill and his wife, Barbara, are well in San Barbara, Calif., and fully expect to remain there, a long way from Wesleyan.

A belated recognition of the passing of Milton L. “Snuffy” Smith ’53, MAT ’55, 86, Aug. 23, 2018, in Georgia. Milton, a member of Delta Tau Delta, an English major, received an MAT degree in 1955. After a time in the Navy and at Perkin Elmer and Raytheon corporations, he joined the staff of the College of Technology SUNY, Utica, and was president of the local school board. After retirement, he with his wife, Gail, moved to Georgia, first to Big Canoe then to a retirement facility. He authored Wildlife Whimsy (2009) that described his encounter with a variety of wild animals in Upstate New York. The book was dedicated to his survivors: Gail and their four daughters. Plans were made to have his remains cremated and inurned in the National Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, as is allowed for 29 years of service in the U.S. Naval Reserve.

Earl J. Forman, 89, died Feb. 2, 2019, in Wayland, Mass. A member of the John Wesley Club and a chemistry major, Earl received his PhD in analytical chemistry from MIT in 1957. He joined Hercules, Inc., and then Polaroid Corp. in 1970, remaining until retirement in 1994. He was an active supporter of the Jewish community, serving as president of two congregations. In addition to being an avid bicyclist, he was often found on the golf course. Survivors include his wife Beatrice, three sons, and seven grandchildren.

Robert C. Lavin, 87, of Duxbury, Mass., died Nov. 24. President of Alpha Chi Sigma and a math major, Bob was best known for his pass-catching ability of the football team. After two years in the Army Counter Intelligence Corp., Bob joined the family business, manufacturing air pollution control systems. He became president of the Robert C. Lavin Corporation (LAVCOR). He served several organizations: the Shriners Hospital for Children-Boston, Masonic Lodge and district offices, and after moving to Duxbury, the Yacht Club, the senior center, and the Council on Aging and Rural and Historical Society.

Bob was known for his extraordinary talent at the piano. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Joan, three daughters, 10 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

On behalf of the class, condolences are offered for those classmates who have departed.

JOHN W. MILLER | jwalmiller@aol.com
306 Autumn Court, Bartlesville, OK 74006 | 918/335-0081 

CLASS OF 1953 | 2019 | ISSUE 2

Walter Cutler’s book, Wandering the World: Personal Recollections of a Life in Diplomacy, is no ordinary memoir. This book, fast-moving and highly personal, focuses on the human side of a profession that can be at once sobering and stimulating, and includes a chapter on Wesleyan and the Fletcher School. It’s available on Amazon.

Basil Anex sent the first page of The Seattle Times business section that featured Herb Kelleher’s career with the comment, “Only HK could make an airline revolution this fun.” Basil and his wife, Gretchen, remain in their home enjoying when possible the many events available in Seattle, including weekend dance band evenings. In-home care 24/7 for Basil and a nighttime CPAP machine make all this possible. Their son Doan is employed at the Livermore Labs, following his father’s footsteps as a physical chemist. Their two daughters are employed in the Seattle area.

Phil Olsen is one of the most traveled classmates, after our Reunion, having spent the summer 720 kilometers north of the Arctic Circle at the site of his great-uncle’s fishery connecting with family relatives. He planned to spend his 88th birthday in February on the Trinity Peninsula, Antarctica. (I assume he did, but have not heard otherwise). In between travels he enjoys a comfortable seat at Honolulu’s Waikiki Elks Club lanai, inches from the foamy sea.

Martin L. Coyne’s daughter Melissa ’81 is sad to announce that her father died on April 9 following a valiant battle with emphysema. Marty was born in Brooklyn in 1931 and graduated with honors in psychology. As the president of Psi Sigma Kappa, he encouraged the fraternity to break away from its national affiliate when it refused admission to an African American member and formed Gamma Psi. He served in the Army and then worked in commodities where he was one of the top people in his field worldwide as senior vice president at J. Aron & Company then a partner at Goldman Sachs. Following his early retirement, Marty devoted his time to philanthropic and charitable causes, volunteering for Hospice-by-the-Sea, Jewish Federation, the Mizner Festival for the Arts, and as chairman of the Florida Philharmonic, to name but a few. He used a $1 million work bonus to found the Coyne Family Foundation (which has donated almost $2.5 million since 1985), established AMORE (which provided free financial advice to the elderly), was co-founder of the Boca Raton Symphonia (now in its 15th year), and recently started the Healing Sounds of Music (which provides healing music programs by professional musicians in assisted-living facilities in Boca Raton). For those who are interested, contributions to healingsoundsofmusic.org would be gratefully accepted.

Condolences of the class to Martin’s family and thanks for his generosity.

I find myself again this summer at my Shunpike Farm in Morris, N.Y., with my two girls, a long-haired Chihuahua and a pit bull. Let me know your summer activities for the next issue.

JOHN W. MILLER | Jwalmiller@aol.com
306 Autumn Court, Bartlesville, OK 74006 | 918/335-0081 

Martin L. Coyne ’53

Martin L. Coyne’s daughter Melissa ’81, is sad to announce that her father died on April 9, 2019 following a valiant battle with emphysema. Marty was born in Brooklyn in 1931 and graduated with honors in psychology. As the President of Psi Sigma Kappa, he encouraged the fraternity to break away from its National Affiliate when it refused admission to an African American member and formed Gamma Psi. He served in the Army and then worked in commodities where he was one of the top people in his field worldwide, as senior vice president at J. Aron & Co then a partner at Goldman Sachs.

Following his early retirement, Marty devoted his time to philanthropic and charitable causes, volunteering for Hospice-by-the-Sea, Jewish Federation, the Mizner Festival for the Arts and as Chairman of the Florida Philharmonic, to name but a few. He used a $1 million work bonus to found the Coyne Family Foundation (which has donated almost $2.5 million since 1985), established AMORE, which provided free financial advice to the elderly, was co-founder of the Boca Raton Symphonia (now in its 15th year) and recently started the Healing Sounds of Music which provides healing music programs by professional musicians in assisted living facilities in Boca Raton. For those who are interested, contributions to healingsoundsofmusic.org would be gratefully accepted.

CLASS OF 1953 | 2019 | ISSUE 1

The most widely known member of our class, Herbert David “Herb” Kelleher, 87, died Jan. 3, 2019. He was remembered in the Wall Street Journal for his friendship and incredible inspiration with a half-page obituary with photographs and a full page ad by the employees and retirees of Southwest Airlines and by Chase. He “democratized the skies” as Southwest claims. “The affordability and availability of airline travel is now taken for granted for one reason—the tenacity of Herb”(WSJ editorial). Herb was an English major, a DKE, college body president, a student-athlete in football and basketball, and NYU law school graduate. Each member of the class has his own memory of Herb as an undergraduate. Mine is his catching for a touchdown, a tipped pass in the Amherst end zone to tie the score and end the game. Unable to attend our 65th because of a doctor’s travel restriction, Herb asked me to pass along his greetings to all. Herb is survived by his wife, Joan, three children, and many grandchildren.

George Alfred Lewis, 87, of Westfield, N.J., passed away Dec. 22, 2018. George was a history major, an Alpha Delta Phi, and four-year baseball player. After Army service he embarked on a career in data processing management with New York Telephone and then AT&T, even though he never touched a computer and struggled with technology. A longtime tennis player, he umpired around the state including the US Open in New York. George had a passion for history, especially 1920-1945 and Winston Churchill, having served on the board of the International Churchill Society. His son, Peter ’78, said if George could pass a message to the alumni it would be: “Next time you come upon a homeless person, instead of walking past, reach into your wallet and pull out a $10 bill.” He was thrilled to hold his great-grandson shortly before he died. George is survived by his wife, Barbara; son Peter; daughter Amy; and a granddaughter.

Jerry Zackin became a great-grandfather of William, son of Katie Zackin ’10 and Robert Roose ’04 and grandson of Michael Zackin ’80 and Mary Nastuk-Zackin ’80 in December, while Sandy and he were on a cruise/expedition to Antarctica “making ‘wet’ (water up to our calves) landings every day, seeing lots of penguins, whales, and seals.” In May they cruised from Dubai to Rome with stops in Egypt, Jordan, Israel, and others.

Ed Lifset’s note described his recovery from a fall three years ago that resulted in a fractured right hip, elbow, and tibia. This caused him to abandon a planned trip, two days later, to Afghanistan and central Asia. This would have been his 54th trip out of the country. With a titanium rod in his leg from hip to knee and plenty of screws, he is relatively mobile, with the aid of a cane. Ed hopes to visit the campus one more time if an occasion arises.

JOHN W. MILLER | Jwalmiller@aol.com
306 Autumn Court, Bartlesville, OK 74006 | 918/335-0081